Cintiq Pro 24 Overview and Comparison

Posted by Stefan Petit on

           

 

Hopefully you've already seen our Unboxing video of the Cintiq Pro 24, if not, check it out here first! 

          The recent release of the Cintiq Pro has been a huge success to say the least. It’s a great size, giving you plenty of drawing room, without over crowding your workspace. A while back we did a review comparing the 27QHD, 22HD, and smaller Cintiq Pros. Many of those points still apply, but as of writing this, the CP24 Touch has not been released. So is the touch worth the wait, or is the nontouch a great choice now? Would you rather have a portable Cintiq Pro over a desktop station? Does resolution matter to you? Or how about the possibility of the Wacom Engines in the larger Cintiq Pros? 

            At a price point of $2000 for the CP24 nontouch, and $2500 for the touch, I think it’s a better choice over the 27”. The cost might seem a tad high considering the loss in size, but the other features definitely make up for that. Now the 22HD is great, but if you had to put money down on a Cintiq, there’s no reason not to put a bit more on the CP24. The only downside there is that the CP24’s stand is not included, and just like the 27 stands, it will cost a heavy price. The 22 is currently a popular choice for studios, whether this will still be the case in a few months, is still yet to be determined.    

 

Cintiq Pro 24

            Compared to the 13 and 16” Cintiq Pro, the differences from the 24 (other than size) might be pretty apparent, but I think that alone can be more than enough to sway someone to drop the extra cash. The amount of space you have when painting can be crucial to an artist’s workflow.

Some consumers were very disappointed with the lack of connection options with the CP13 and 16, making it very difficult to use PC hardware and HDMI. However, the CP24 has all your necessary cables including USBC, MiniDisplay, DisplayPort, and HDMI.

However, where I really think the Cintiq Pro will outshine the competition, and its own Cintiq siblings, is the Wacom Engine. I’ll really get to test and review the Engines in depth when they are released, but we’ll try to skim over the basics here.

Designed as a sleek cartridge-like installation, the Engine adds professional computing power to your Cintiq. There will be two versions, an Intel i5 model and an Intel Xeon. They will only run on Windows, but don’t be afraid if you are more familiar with Mac OS, either of these options will be powerful enough to run any rendering software and even VR.

 

Cintiq Pro 24 Stand

            There has also been a huge improvement on the new Ergo Stand. Its robust design can hold your Cintiq securely as you work in any comfortable position. The original stand was quite sturdy plus had raise and tilt features, but this new design allows rotation, a much needed feature for any versatile artist. 

The Improvements in the 24 are very exciting and really gives Wacom an edge during a time where they have some real competition out there in the market today. As an art student, the Cintiq Pro 24 is something I really aspire to own one day. Even though “The tools don’t make the artist”, a Cintiq Pro is an essential accessory for the modern artist; and Wacom makes some of the best.

 

Purchase Cintiq Pro 24

           


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